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Cardedu Monica di Sardegna Praja

$29.00

2 in stock

Vintage: 2022
Region: Sardinia, Italy
Viticulture: Organic
Grape varieties: 100% Monica

Cardedu Monica di Sardegna Praja is made from vineyards planted near cliffs that go straight down to the Mediterranean and capture the salty sea breeze. Dry and earthy, with dusty red fruit, figs, and a touch of mint and sage, the ‘Praja’ tastes best with a slight chill, but is far from glou glou.

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Additional information

NATTINESS

Natty

FRUIT

Blackberry, Red Berries

BODY

Medium-bodied

ACIDITY

Bright (Medium-High)

ALCOHOL

12-13%

OAK

No Oak

TANNIN

Medium

SWEETNESS

Dry

SULFUR

Low Sulfur (less than 50mg/L)

SERVING TEMP

Cool Red and Orange (58°–62°)

VEGAN

Vegan

IMPORTER

PortoVino

2 in stock

Save 10% when you buy six or more bottles (mix and match) 

ABOUT THE PRODUCER

About Cardedu Monica di Sardegna Praja

Cardedu Monica di Sardegna Praja is named not after a daughter but a grape indigenous to Sardinia, from vineyards in the most mountainous and least populated part of the island. Here the vineyards are planted near cliffs that go straight down to the Mediterranean and capture the salty sea breeze. Dry and earthy, with dusty red fruit, figs, and a touch of mint and sage, the ‘Praja’ tastes best with a slight chill, but is far from glou glou. Chewy tannins add rusticity, charm, and a seductively bitter element. The mellow tannins and acid make it a very versatile crowd-pleaser.

About Cardedu

Sergio Loi is a 4th generation traditional Sardinian producer, whose family winery from the early 1900s has always practiced no chemical farming and minimum intervention in the cellar. The Cardedu [car-DAY-do] vineyards are located on the island’s sparsely populated southeast coast, where soils are made of crumbling granite near the coastline and schist in ragged-dry cliffs around Jerzu.

Sardinian producers are now catching up in popularity to those of Italy’s other large island, Sicilia. One difference remaining is that Sardinia remains more ‘lost in time.’ Cardedu balances on that edge of being traditional but also thoughtful, especially considering today’s warmer climate. The last few vintages have been extremely hot and dry and Cardedu has made lower-alcohol wines by picking earlier and careful vineyard management. The result, thankfully, isn’t 10% alcohol overtly hipster juice without terroir, Sergio says; it’s just wine that tastes more like the cool vintages he enjoyed in the ’70s.

About Monica

Monica is a grape variety found exclusively on the island of Sardinia, off the west coast of Italy. Despite its relatively unknown status, it is one of the island’s most common varieties and makes simple wines designed for everyday drinking. Monica wines tend to be medium-bodied with gentle tannins and flavors of red berries and herbs, often with an earthy overtone.

The variety is thought to have been brought to the island by Spanish conquistadores around the same time as Grenache (known in Sardinia as Cannonau). However, there is no concrete evidence to support this, as Monica is not linked to any famous Spanish grape varieties. Many researchers think that the name Monica is used indiscriminately for any number of unrelated grape varieties grown in Sardinia’s vineyards.

Low levels of acidity and high levels of productivity have marked Monica as a table wine grape. The vine is beloved by producers as it is easy to harvest and gives consistent, abundant results, but caution is needed in the vineyard as Monica can become overripe, resulting in wines with excessive alcohol levels.

Monica’s main showcase is in the Monica di Sardegna DOC, where wines can be still or semi-sparkling (or frizzante). Here, they may be accompanied by other red varieties, although Monica must compose at least 85 percent of the blend. The variety is also used in the more location-specific Monica di Cagliari wines, which are produced in dry and sweet fortified styles.

 

Pairing Ideas