SAVE 10% on Six of More Bottles • We Deliver • SHIPPING NOW AVAILABLE

Bonny Doon Le Cigare Orange Wine

$24.00

1 in stock

Vintage: 2023
Region: Central Coast, California
Viticulture: Organic
Grape varieties: 45% Grenache Blanc, 25% Pinot Gris, 14% Grenache Gris, 9% Orange Muscat, 7% Chenin Blanc

Bonny Doon Le Cigare Orange Wine is a fresh and bright skin-contact white with fresh apricot and peach, citrus, & tangerine blossom notes. A blend of wine varieties found mostly in the Rhone Valley of France.

Song: Heart of Gold by Johnny Cash

Additional information

NATTINESS

Natty

FRUIT

Apricot, Citrus, Yellow Peach

BODY

Medium-bodied

ALCOHOL

11-12%

ACIDITY

Bright (Medium-High)

OAK

No Oak

TANNIN

Medium

SWEETNESS

Dry

SULFUR

Low Sulfur (less than 50mg/L)

SERVING TEMP

Cool Whites and Orange (53°–57°)

VEGAN

Unknown

1 in stock

Save 10% when you buy six or more bottles (mix and match) 

ABOUT THE PRODUCER

About Bonny Doon Le Cigare Orange Wine

Bonny Doon Le Cigare Orange Wine is a fresh and bright skin-contact white with fresh apricot and peach, citrus, & tangerine blossom notes. A blend of wine varieties found mostly in the Rhone Valley of France. Each variety is picked separately at low brix and good natural acidity. Destemmed and fermented at cool temperatures in both rotary and stainless steel closed-top tanks. The average time of skin contact is 14-16 days before pressing into stainless steel. The wine is kept cold and only minimal sulfur is added before bottling.

About Bonny Doon

While Bonny Doon Vineyard began with the (in retrospect) foolish attempt to replicate Burgundy in California, Randall Grahm realized early on that he would have far more success creating more distinctive and original wines working with Rhône varieties in the Central Coast of California. The key learning here (achieved somewhat accidentally but fortuitously) was that in a warm, Mediterranean climate, it is usually blended wines that are most successful. In 1986 Bonny Doon Vineyard released the inaugural vintage (1984) of Le Cigare Volant, an homage to Châteauneuf-du-Pape, and this continues as the winery’s flagship/starship brand.

Since then, Bonny Doon Vineyard has enjoyed a long history of innovation – the first to truly popularize Rhône grapes in California, to successfully work with cryo-extraction for sundry “Vins de Glacière, the first to utilize microbullage in California, the first to popularize screwcaps for premium wines, and, quite significantly, the first to embrace true transparency in labeling with its ingredient labeling initiative. The upside of all of this activity has brought an extraordinary amount of creativity and research to the California wine scene; the doon-side, as it were, was perhaps an ever so slight inability to focus, to settle doon, if you will, into a single, coherent direction.1

Bonny Doon Vineyard grew and grew with some incredibly popular brands (Big House, Cardinal Zin, and Pacific Rim) until it became the 28th largest winery in the United States. Randall came to the realization – better late than Nevers – that he had found that the company had diverged to a great extent from his original intention of producing soulful, distinctive, and original wines and that while it was amusing to be able to get restaurant reservations almost anywhere (the only real tangible perk he was able to discern from the vast scale of the operation), it was time to take a decisive course correction. With this in mind, he sold off the larger brands (Big House and Cardinal Zin) in 2006 and Pacific Rim in 2010.

In the intervening years, the focus of the winery has been to spend far more time working with vineyards in improving their practices, as well as on making wines with a much lighter touch – using indigenous yeast whenever possible, and more or less eschewing vinous maquillage, (at least not to Tammy Faye Bakker-like levels). Recently, Randall has purchased an extraordinary property in San Juan Bautista, which he calls Popelouchum, (the Mutsun word for “paradise,”) where he is profoundly intent on producing singular wines expressive of place. There are also very grand plans afoot to plant a dry-farmed Estate Cigare vineyard.